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The Doom That Came To Atlantic City!

A project in Portland, OR by The Forking Path, Co.
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Funding Successful

A light hearted Lovecraftian game of urban destruction, for two to four players. By Lee Moyer, Keith Baker and Paul Komoda.
Backers: 1245
Average Pledge Per Backer: $99

Funded: $122,769 of $35,000
Dates: May 7th -> Jun 6th (30 days)
Project By: The Forking Path, Co.
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board game +Suggest

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$122,769

current pledge level
Last Updated: June 6 @ 07:01 -0400 GMT

350%

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funding period ended

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Latest News

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Kickstarter fraudster to repay backers after using funds for personal expenses

June 18th - via: toynews-online.biz
FTC orders Erik Chevalier to repay all backers for board game project that raised $122,000 but never saw the light of day. (Read More)

The FTC Goes After Its First Failed Crowdfunding Campaign

June 12th - via: techcrunch.com
The Federal Trade Commission just posted some fascinating details regarding a settlement related to a failed crowdfunded project. The project, a board game.. (Read More)

The Federal Trade Commission Just Handed Down Its First Ruling on Never-Completed Kickstarter Campaigns

June 12th - via: citylab.com
It sounded fun enough: “The Doom That Came to Atlantic City,” its creators said, would be a “lighthearted Lovecraftian game of urban destruction, for two to four players.” Sort of like Monopoly, but with more destruction. The game’s inventors said they needed $35,000 to get the project off the ground, so they turned to crowdfunding—and, naturally, to Kickstarter. Online backers pledged a total of $122,874 in exchange for advance copies of the game, T-shirts, pewter figurines, and special crediting in the game’s eventual rule book. (Read More)

Feds take first action against canceled Kickstarter project

In its first crowdfunding case, the Federal Trade Commission has taken legal action against the developer of a board game who raised more than $122,000 on Kickstarter but failed to deliver a product. (Read More)

“Doom”ed false promises | FTC

June 11th - via: consumer.ftc.gov
Earn rewards for supporting a project you believe in? That’s what “crowdfunding” is all about. Here’s how it works: “Creators” think of projects. To pay for those projects, they ask for small amounts of money from lots of people, usually through online platforms like Kickstarter or Indiegogo. Often, creators offer rewards to contributors. So far, so good … as long as the creators keep their end of the bargain. (Read More)

Kickstarter Lesson #114: The 4 Legal Issues Every Kickstarter Creator Should Know

September 11th - via: stonemaiergames.com
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The Cracks in Crowd-funding and Kickstarter Concerns

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Cancelled $123K Kickstarter board game finds new publisher

August 1st - via: eurogamer.net
Last week I detailed the sad, sorry state of the crowdfunded board game The Doom that Came to Atlantic City, which was cancelled 13 months into production after it raised a whopping $123K - about 3.5 times its initial goal. As it turns out, The Doom that Came to Atlantic City has been saved (sorry, Atlantic City) by board game and trading card publisher Cryptozoic Entertainment. (Read More)

Refund Update

July 31st - via: kickstarter.com
As of this evening I've begun refunding backers along the terms I initially outlined in the Terminus update. I've refunded the top backer, James Bauer, his full $2500 and contacted everyone in the next tier down to confirm payment methods.   Much... (Read More)

Cryptozoic Saves ‘Doom’

July 31st - via: icv2.com
Cryptozoic Entertainment will publish the board game The Doom That Came to Atlantic City in 2014, the company announced today. The news comes just a week after the announcement by the previous publisher that the Kickstarter-backed game had been cancelled, much to the dismay of both Kickstarter backers and game creators Keith Baker and Lee Moyer. (Read More)

The Doom That Came to Kickstarter

July 28th - via: geekdad.com
Chuck Lawton’s post about how Kickstarter is broken really made me stop to think about the way I, as a blogger, approach Kickstarter projects. When I reviewed The Doom That Came to Atlantic City last year, I treated it the way I approached most Kickstarter board games. That is, I judged it mostly on the gameplay and the artwork that I’d seen, not on any examination of the project’s business plan. I’d communicated mostly with Keith Baker (the game designer) and Lee Moyer (the artist), but hadn’t had any direct interactions with Erik Chevalier, the project owner (and the one who was ultimately responsible for the Kickstarter project). (Read More)

Clarifications

July 25th - via: kickstarter.com
This is not the post-mortem but a clarification for the last update. Its wordy, yes, but there is a lot of clarifying to do as many have already stated. I've read every comment but they are too many to address individually. I've attempted to respond... (Read More)

Kickstarter Project Canceled After Dude Spends All the Money

July 25th - via: valleywag.gawker.com
If you were thinking about donating some money to help Spike Lee get back on his feet, maybe think twice: this guy just raised over $120,000 to make a game, and then just walked away with all the money. Contrary to what The Crowd Economy preaches, strangers can still screw you. (Read More)

Keith Baker Responds to Cancelled Doom That Came to Atlantic City Kickstarter

July 25th - via: geekosystem.com
Two days ago, Erik Chevalier of the Forking Path announced that he has cancelled the Kickstarter to produce The Doom That Came To Atlantic City, a board game designed by Lee Moyer and Keith Baker, which is to say, me. When Lee and I first heard this news from Erik, it came as a shock. We've been working on this game for over a decade. (Read More)

Terminus

July 23rd - via: kickstarter.com
This is not an easy update to write.  The short version: The project is over, the game is canceled. After much deliberation I've had to make this decision. I've informed Keith and Lee and neither at all happy with this situation. Every possible... (Read More)

June Update

June 2nd - via: kickstarter.com
Greetings Backers, Just touching base so you know we're still alive. The project is moving along but there isn't any news beyond our last update to add. Still looking at a Q3 release. Remember, you can keep up with Lee Moyer on his blog... (Read More)

One Year (Or Pretty Close)!

May 7th - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

April 1st Update

April 2nd - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

March 1st Update Time!

March 2nd - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

Estimated Release Date & Scheduled Updates

February 2nd - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

Holiday of a Thousand Young.

December 18th - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

Updated Release Schedule

December 12th - via: kickstarter.com
This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read. (Read More)

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